search NTU only
Rubics Cube Rubics Cube 2

“EVERYTHING THAT HAS TO DO WITH EDUCATION IS OUR DOMAIN.”
Albert Shanker...

PARENT &
COMMUNITY INFORMATION
CENTER

FIGHT BACK FRIDAY INFORMATION CENTER

Put this on your calendar 1

Fight Back Friday
Friday,May 30, 2014
30 minutes before school or
30 minutes after school
Dress all black

Regional NTU Membership Meeting
Check back soon...



NTU Retiree Mtg
See you next year!

NTU Retiree Luncheon
Thursday, June 12, 2014
The Spanish Manor at Noon
Click for all the details...

 

online_survey icon

HELLO?
DID YOU TAKE THE ONE NEWARK SURVEY?
CLICK HERE
!

Join Us On Facebook

Chat Live with union members. Discuss union news & events

 Go to NTU Chat

NTU Quick Links

 About Us

 Address Change

 Calendar

 Contact NTU

 Contract and Forms

 Employment

 Games

 Important Numbers

 Join E-mail List

 Kudos

 Locate Bldg Rep

 Member Benefits

 NTU Archive

 PIF

 Retirees

 Staff Directory

 Store

 Sub Finder

 Surveys

NTU PLUS MEMBER BENEFITS

- Free life insurance
-Home Insurance
-Auto Insurance
-Pet Insurance
-No fee credit card
-15% off wireless plans
-Special mortgages
 

FREE MEMBERSHIP PACKETS ARE AVAILABLE
FROM YOUR BUILDING REP OR THE NTU

Get yours today and enjoy the many benefits of being an NTU Member...

Professional Development

New Jersey State Federation of Teachers

Teachers

NTU Membership Sign-up Giveaways!
The NTU has three packages available for Prospective Members, New Members, and Agency Shop to Full Members. 
These packages are FREE and we only require that you complete, sign and return to the NTU office via mail or drop-off your (white) dues deduction and (blue) cope deduction forms. These two forms can be downloaded here.
Once we have verified receipt of your forms, we will notify you via email that your package is ready to be picked up.
Click here to enter the NTU General Store.
While supplies last and one package per member.

The New Jersey Model for Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers

  • There are to be no consequences for individual teachers in terms of job loss if they have not yet satisfied the federal definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher. This is especially true for teachers in Title I schools. Teachers holding emergency certification complete only the Statement of Assurance. They cannot become highly qualified without a standard license, Certificate of Eligibility with Advanced Standing (CEAS) or a Certificate of Eligibility (CE).
  • All forms and related documentation are due to building principals not later than Friday, October 14, 2005 for all new hires, any teacher with a change in content area teaching assignment, and any teacher who has not yet satisfied the definition of Highly Qualified Teacher. New, newly hired and veteran teachers in non-Title I schools, as well as veteran teachers in Title I schools, must satisfy the definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher by the end of the 2005-2006 school year. Federal regulations require that new and newly hired teachers in Title I schools be highly qualified at the time of hire (See appendix 2 for details).
  • The Department of Education’s role in implementing the federal requirement is to provide districts with the orientation, training and support needed to assist schools in completing the Highly Qualified Teacher identification process; to create a state profile using the Highly Qualified Teacher Survey data; and to determine the Annual Yearly Progress goals for increasing the percentage of classes taught by Highly Qualified Teachers.
  • The district’s role in implementation of the federal requirement is to provide schools and teachers with the orientation, inservice and support needed to complete the Highly Qualified Teacher identification process including, where necessary, the NJ HOUSE Standard: Content Knowledge Matrix (see page 32) and to gather and maintain the identification data at the building level. Schools that receive Title I funding (including funds used for before/after school programs) must comply with the parent notification requirements under No Child Left Behind. In September 2005, schools receiving Title I funds must notify all parents of their right to inquire about the qualifications of their child’s teacher(s). A sample letter (Sample A) and additional parent information have been provided in the appendix. By the end of October 2005, schools receiving Title I funds must notify parents if any of their child’s teachers have not yet satisfied the definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher. A sample letter (Sample B) and additional parent information have been provided in the appendix. The Sample B letter (or a modified version) must be sent to any parent whose child has been instructed for four or more weeks by a teacher who has not yet satisfied the definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher. Parent notification requirements apply to the entire school—whether or not the teacher is paid in whole or in part by Title I funds or teaches within a targeted assistance program.
  • Appendices have been added to provide information about Praxis II content knowledge exams and requirements for teachers in Title I schools.
     

The New Jersey Model for Identifying Highly Qualified Teachers

The federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), reauthorized in 2001, requires that all teachers be or become highly qualified in the core academic content area(s) they teach. NCLB places major emphasis upon teacher quality as a factor in improving achievement for all students. This emphasis grows out of the research showing that teachers’ mastery of the academic content they teach is critical to engaging students and is a significant factor in raising levels of student achievement.

It is vital that districts and teachers understand that there are to be no consequences to individual teachers in terms of job loss, if teachers have not yet met the definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher. This is particularly true in schools supported with Title I funds. The state has a responsibility under the federal law to support and monitor district progress toward meeting the goal of increasing the number of highly qualified teachers. Districts have a responsibility to support and monitor teacher progress toward meeting the goal of satisfying the Highly Qualified Teacher definition.

This packet contains two types of forms. Teachers will complete the appropriate NJ Highly Qualified Teacher Identification form(s) based on the certification(s) they hold for their present teaching assignment(s). These forms will be used to determine whether the teacher satisfies the definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher based on the federal criteria for the particular teaching assignment held.

Veteran teachers who do not satisfy the federal criteria advance to the NJ High Objective Uniform State Evaluation (HOUSE) Standard and complete a Content Knowledge Matrix to determine whether they satisfy the definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher using the alternate criteria of the NJ HOUSE Standard. Teachers who do not yet document 10 points on the NJ HOUSE Standard Content Knowledge Matrix have until the end of the 2005-2006 school year to accrue 10 points in order to satisfy the definition.

New and newly hired teachers in Title I schools must satisfy the definition of a highly qualified teacher at the time of hire. Veteran teachers and experienced teachers who are newly hired in Title I schools may satisfy the definition using the NJ HOUSE Standard Content Knowledge Matrix. First-year teachers in Title I schools may not use the NJ HOUSE Standard to satisfy the requirement.

Flexibility for Special Education Teachers — The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was reauthorized in December 2004 and takes effect July 1, 2005. It permits special education teachers who teach core academic subjects to students assessed against alternate proficiency standards to satisfy the Highly Qualified Teacher requirement as elementary generalists. It also provides new special education teachers who are teaching multiple subjects in middle and secondary settings and who satisfy Highly Qualified Teacher requirements for math, science or language arts with up to two years from their date of hire to demonstrate content expertise in the remaining core academic subjects they teach. New special education teachers may use the NJ HOUSE Standard Content Knowledge Matrix to demonstrate content expertise in the remaining subjects—even if they work in Title I schools. There is no extension of the 2006 deadline for veteran special education teachers who teach multiple content areas. Special education teachers who provide support and consultation exclusively satisfy federal requirements by holding full state certification as special education teachers.

Read more here

© Newark Teachers Union 2011

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by the Newark Teachers Union and while we endeavor to keep the information up-to-date and correct, we make no representations of any kind about the completeness, accuracy and reliability, with respect to the website or the information.

Last updated: May 29, 2014